Fly Geyser

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The Fly Ranch was first homesteaded in the late 1800s by Fred Gerlach, son of Louis Gerlach, for whom the town of Gerlach was named.

Spring City Post Office was located here from June 1866 until October 1866 and then renamed to Hot Springs Post Office from October 1866 until August 1867.

The springs near Fly Ranch were referred to as Ward's Hot Springs in an 1886 geology report.

The 1893 Rand McNally map shows "Wards".

In 1916, a well was drilled and a travertine formation 5 meters high was created. This formation is known as "The Thumb." Today, there is very little, if any, water coming out of The Thumb.

In 1947, Overton discusses Director Carpenter's visit to the area and reports that Mr. Moore of the Pacific Portland Gypsum states that the cone has grown up two to three feet in the last six to ten years. Overton appears to name The Thumb: " Being near a reservoir, the name of Reservoir Fountain is appropriate"[1]

In 1964, a well was drilled by Western Geothermal. This well started leaking and created the formation that is known as Fly Geyser. The red and green colors represent two different species of algae.

Fly Geyser sits on a dais of mud amidst ponds of warm water and thriving plants.

Fly Ranch was a part of the John Casey estate, until it was sold to Todd Jaksick (Bright Holland Corporation) in 1998. The property is generally off limits to visitors because of liability and vandalism concerns.

In September, 2010, there was a plan to buy Fly Geyser, see Archive.org: 13 May 2011 http://gotgeyser.com.

http://flyranchproject.org/ discusses Burning Man efforts at purchasing the land.

References

  1. Theodore D. Overton, "B046: Mineral resources of Douglas, Ormsby, and Washoe Counties," B046, Nevada Bureau of Mines & Geology, 1947. Full version with lower resolution images. Includes images of Fly Geyser, the Petrified Forest, Gerlach Hot Springs that are in the collection at UNR.

See Also


Resources

  • Wikipedia
  • GNIS, Fly Reservoir Dam
    • Citation: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dams and Reservoirs List, Washington, DC. 31-Mar-1981. A listing of impounded bodies of water and associated information.
  • GNIS, Fly Reservoir
    • Citation: U.S. Geological Survey. Geographic Names Post Phase I Map Revisions. Various editions. 01-Jan-2000.
  • GNIS, Wards Hot Spring
    • Citation: Garside, L. J. and Schilling, J. H. 'Thermal Waters of Nevada' Reno: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Bulletin 91, 1979, 163 pp. Describes hot springs and hot water seeps of Nevada with location information and map at 1:1,000,000. p130
    • Variant: Fly Ranch Hot Spring: Citation: Garside, L. J. and Schilling, J. H. 'Thermal Waters of Nevada' Reno: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Bulletin 91, 1979, 163 pp. Describes hot springs and hot water seeps of Nevada with location information and map at 1:1,000,000. p130
    • Hualapai Flat Hot Spring: Citation: Garside, L. J. and Schilling, J. H. 'Thermal Waters of Nevada' Reno: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Bulletin 91, 1979, 163 pp. Describes hot springs and hot water seeps of Nevada with location information and map at 1:1,000,000. p130
    • Wards Ranch Hot Spring: Citation: Garside, L. J. and Schilling, J. H. 'Thermal Waters of Nevada' Reno: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Bulletin 91, 1979, 163 pp. Describes hot springs and hot water seeps of Nevada with location information and map at 1:1,000,000. p130
  • Google Map
  • Las Vegas Sun, January 29, 2010 "Geyser on private land chosen as attraction to draw tourists to state."
  • November 2001 Reno Gazette Journal article

Images

Geology