Difference between revisions of "Reynard"

From Black Rock Desert Nevada wiki
Jump to navigationJump to search
(Added The Train Sheet citation about the origin.)
 
(2 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
Reynard is a [[Railroad | railroad]] siding between [[Sano]] and [[Bronte]].  South of Reynard is the site of [[Smoke Creek Station]]<ref>Helen S. Carlson, "[http://books.google.com/books?id=BixwbIM7ZvAC&lpg=PA219&dq=Reynard%20Nevada&pg=PA219#v=onepage&q=Reynard%20Nevada&f=falseNevada Place Names: A Geographical Dictionary]," p. 219</ref>.
Reynard is a [[Railroad | railroad]] siding between [[Sano]] and [[Bronte]].  South of Reynard is the site of [[Smoke Creek Station]]<ref>Helen S. Carlson, "[http://books.google.com/books?id=BixwbIM7ZvAC&lpg=PA219&dq=Reynard%20Nevada&pg=PA219#v=onepage&q=Reynard%20Nevada&f=falseNevada Place Names: A Geographical Dictionary]," p. 219</ref>.


Wikipedia states "Reynard is a literary cycle of allegorical French, Dutch, English, and German fables largely concerned with Reynard, an anthropomorphic red fox and trickster figure"<ref>"[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reynard Reynard]," Wikipedia, accessed 27-Nov-2014</ref>.  Probably Reynard and the nearby [[Fox Range]] share a common origin.
Wikipedia states "Reynard is a literary cycle of allegorical French, Dutch, English, and German fables largely concerned with Reynard, an anthropomorphic red fox and trickster figure"<ref>"[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reynard Reynard]," Wikipedia, accessed 27-Nov-2014</ref>.  Probably Reynard and the nearby [[Fox Range]] share a common origin. "The Train Sheet" states that Reynard is the namr of the fox in "Reynard the Fox" and that foxes were common in the area.<ref>Vic Neves, "[https://www.wplives.org/train_sheet_archive/pdf/ts042.pdf What's in a name? Romance Among the ties of the W. P.", The Train Sheet]," March/April 1990, number 42.</ref>


Myrick states that prior to 1917, the Western Pacific was considering building a light-traffic line from Reynard through [[Buffalo Canyon]] to the [[Surprise Valley]] near [[Cedarville]]<ref>David F. Myrick, "[http://books.google.com/books?id=G7NNMH9X4w8C&lpg=PA331&dq=Reynard%20Nevada&pg=PA331#v=onepage&q=Reynard%20Nevada&f=false Railroads of Nevada and Eastern California: The northern roads]," p. 331</ref>.
Myrick states that prior to 1917, the Western Pacific was considering building a light-traffic line from Reynard through [[Buffalo Canyon]] to the [[Surprise Valley]] near [[Cedarville]]<ref>David F. Myrick, "[http://books.google.com/books?id=G7NNMH9X4w8C&lpg=PA331&dq=Reynard%20Nevada&pg=PA331#v=onepage&q=Reynard%20Nevada&f=false Railroads of Nevada and Eastern California: The northern roads]," p. 331</ref>.
Line 8: Line 8:




[[Image:Cscrm_000335_07_access3675x2040.jpg|right|thumb|WPRR 1910 Timetable showing Reynard]]
[[Image:1930_D&RGW_WP.jpg|right|thumb|c. 1914 map of the W.P.R.R. showing Reynard]]
[[Image:1930_D&RGW_WP.jpg|right|thumb|c. 1914 map of the W.P.R.R. showing Reynard]]


Line 13: Line 14:
<references/>
<references/>


[[Category:Railroad sidings]]
[[Category:Smoke Creek Desert]]
[[Category:Smoke Creek Desert]]

Latest revision as of 03:48, 22 October 2020

Reynard is a railroad siding between Sano and Bronte. South of Reynard is the site of Smoke Creek Station[1].

Wikipedia states "Reynard is a literary cycle of allegorical French, Dutch, English, and German fables largely concerned with Reynard, an anthropomorphic red fox and trickster figure"[2]. Probably Reynard and the nearby Fox Range share a common origin. "The Train Sheet" states that Reynard is the namr of the fox in "Reynard the Fox" and that foxes were common in the area.[3]

Myrick states that prior to 1917, the Western Pacific was considering building a light-traffic line from Reynard through Buffalo Canyon to the Surprise Valley near Cedarville[4].

In 1921, the Nevada State Legislature granted a right of way to John E. Sexton and associates that ran from Reynard northwest to T 37N R 18 E, which is near Duck Lake and the California line. During the first 10 years, operating the line was optional during January, February and March.[5]


WPRR 1910 Timetable showing Reynard
c. 1914 map of the W.P.R.R. showing Reynard

References

  1. Helen S. Carlson, "Place Names: A Geographical Dictionary," p. 219
  2. "Reynard," Wikipedia, accessed 27-Nov-2014
  3. Vic Neves, "What's in a name? Romance Among the ties of the W. P.", The Train Sheet," March/April 1990, number 42.
  4. David F. Myrick, "Railroads of Nevada and Eastern California: The northern roads," p. 331
  5. Senator Cowles"Statutes of the State of Nevada," Nevada Senate Bill 109, March 28, 1921