Cedar Springs

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Cedar Springs is a spring located southeast of Scossa and southwest of Antelope Springs.

Cedar Springs Pass was one of the first passes on the Applegate-Lassen Trail after the trail departed Lassen Meadows.

Davis writes:

"The overland travel through the county in the early days followed the course of the Humboldt River to a point known as "Lassen Meadows," from the residence there of a man named Lassen, who afterward moved to California and from whom the Lassen County of that State is named. This place was on the river, about four miles west of Humboldt House. Here the overland route divided, the main travel going across the river to the West, out through the Cedar Springs Pass to the Black Rock Desert, through Susanville and the Beckwith Pass in the Sierras, to the gold fields of California."[1]

Modern maps show the pass as "Antelope Summit".

Cedar Station

A teamster named Bellew (aka Ballou) was killed near Cedar Springs Station in 1865.

"Mr. Ballou had got up opposite Cedar Station (about fifteen miles from the Humboldt River)"[2]

Other Cedar Springs and Cedar Station

In 1867, a Belmont newspaper reported that a body was found at Cedar Springs Station, which could be a different location than this Cedar Springs Station in what is now Pershing County. Initially, the body was thought to be the body of a murdered white man, but upon examination it was found to be the body of an Indigenous woman who had been buried about six months.[3]

There is also a Cedar Station near Eureka.

Antelope Springs, Willow Springs and Cedar Springs, from the 1985 1:100,000 Eugene Mtns USGS Map.

References

  1. "The History of Nevada," Sam P. Davis, p. 889, 1913.
  2. "Indian Massacre," The Chico Weekly Courant, November 18, 1865, p. 2
  3. "Dead Body Found," The Carson Daily Appeal, p. 2, May 16, 1867.